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Delafield & Malloy Investigations eBooks

Delafield & Malloy Investigations eBooks

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A society writer and a former lady’s maid join forces to expose the dark side of the rich and powerful in the 1910s while also searching for love and success in their own lives.

The Whispering Women A pair of female sleuths dig into 1913 New York's underworld in the first Delafield & Malloy Investigation!

The Butterfly CageBuffalo Bill, the Prince of Monaco, panic attacks, and a mysterious string of abductions to Panama!

The Burning BrideDynamite-wielding anarchists, hungry alligators, a raging fire, and Louisa and Ellen's wayward hearts!

Secrets and SpiesSubterfuge, deception, German saboteurs, and the sinking of the Lusitania!

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Customer Reviews

Based on 52 reviews
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L
Lizanne
Edwardian-era period drama w richly drawn characters

In NYC in the early 1900s, two women have hit plateaus and cannot rise to any better station. Newspaper columnist Louisa Delafield writes about society events, the type she would have attended if her father had not died and left the family with limited resources. She’s not looking to rejoin the gilded age set; she wants a more adventurous beat. Ellen (last name escapes me) is an Irish woman stuck in a menial job which she abandons for good reason, condemning her to leave America for another equally unsatisfying job.Eventually, the women’s lives cross (of course) and they find themselves investigating a mysterious disappearance, leading to a cover up involving sexual abuse and abortion.While Louisa can be naive, Ellen counterbalances her with her firm common sense (then takes crazy risks herself). They enrich one another’s lives.The novel is resplendent w period details—clothes, households, architecture. The research was one of my favorite elements.Good read w lots of drama and—in MacEnulty fashion—strong female protagonists.

N
NettaB
Totally enjoying this book! The time period verbiage paints a fabulous picture of a bygone era.

Great use of vocabulary throughout. MacEnulty keeps to the time period with, dress, vehicles, buildings, food etc. Allows me to relax and travel back in time which has been a welcome reprieve from my current daily grind.

D
Darla Evans
A Worthy Novel

Historical Romances aren't usually my cup of Starbucks, but this one by author Trish MacEnulty is a clear exception. Ms MacEnulty is a meticulous storyteller and an empathetic one. She takes us deep into the turmoil, the snobbery, the struggles of women of the early 1900's to whom voting rights and body autonomy are impossible daydreams. Louisa Delafield, former socialite, and Ellen Malloy, an unemployed lady's maid strike up an unlikely friendship. And with little money or influence, they set out to bring justice to a criminal who is not only protected by well-heeled society but is necessary for their place in the Manhattan pecking order. We get a ripping fun tale, a murder mystery, two plucky heroines and a look at early New York's pride, prejudices, idiocies, and misogyny, all of which are still hovering in the shadows of today's headlines. I can't wait for our next adventure!

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LibMama
Historical Fiction set in 1913

At first this book was slow, it’s in 2 perspectives, Ellen’s and Louisa’s. Once we get past the character building of these women and they come together, it’s just a non stop roller coaster! I couldn’t put it down, especially in the last 200 pages. I will 100% be reading the 2nd book when I can get my hands on it!A great historical fiction mystery book that will keep you on your toes middle to end!

F
Florida Girl
Well done!

I really enjoyed this book! A historical setting, early 20th century, that was fun to wander through. I enjoyed the storyline and the characters and was happy it wasn’t a romance novel. The core thread was women waking up, growing up, connecting with each other, and solving a crime. It took me a little bit to feel drawn in, but once I was, I found I wanted to keep reading instead of doing important things like eat dinner! Serious social issues were very much a part of the story, which also feels relevant today, sadly.